A Terms in Aussie Rules Football

a glossary of terms

D

daisy cutter ∼ grubber
a kick that runs along the ground rather than through the air
Also may to refer to a drop punt in which the ball travels through the air, but low to the ground.
deliberate out of bounds
a rule which results in a free kick
The rule has a long history in Aussie rules footy dating back to the 19th century.
The Laws of Australian Football
A Free Kick shall be awarded against a Player who intentionally Kicks, Handballs or forces the football over the Boundary Line without the football being touched by another Player.
The rule was introduced to put an end to the disliked strategy of kicking the ball out of bounds as a means of timewasting. The rule has existed more or less unchanged, with the exception of the period from 1925 until 1938 when a free kick was paid against the last player to touch the ball, whether deliberate or not. Although the rule has been largely unchanged, the strictness of its application has varied over time. A specific directive to apply the rule more strictly was introduced in the 2016 AFL season in an attempt to reduce the number of boundary throw-ins.
designated kicker
a player who receives the ball from a player who has a set shot for goal
So that the receiving player may have a shot on the run.
Typically done when the designated kicker is known to have a better likelihood of scoring than the player taking the set shot.
disposal
passing the ball legally
Via a handball or kick.
don't argue ∼ stiff-arm fend
a very powerful offensive weapon
The ball-carriers run towards defenders who are attempting to tackle them. By positioning the ball securely in one arm, the ball‑carrier can fully extend his other arm, locking his elbow, and outstretching his palm. Then, the ball-carrier pushes directly outwards with the palm of his hand onto the chest or shoulder of the would-be tackler. The fend is a pushing action, rather than a striking action. The fend is particularly effective because its force is applied down the length of a straight arm, directly into the shoulder. This puts the arm bones exclusively under compressive axial stress, the stress to which bone is strongest, and ensures that minimal torque is applied to the shoulder joint. As such, the force that can be applied by a stiff-arm fend can easily repel or topple an oncoming defender. A fend may cause the tackler to fall to the ground, taking him out of the play. Even if the tackler keeps his feet, it becomes impossible for him to complete a tackle, as he cannot come close enough to wrap his arms around the ball-carrier. Ball-carriers in Australian football must be careful to avoid fending opponents in the head or neck, otherwise they will concede a high tackle free kick. The same techniques are practised by some schools of martial artists when striking or punching; by ensuring that the direction of the force is directly down a locked, straight arm, martial artists can punch through bricks and tiles without damaging their arms. The term don't argue describes what a commentator imagined the ball-carrier might be saying as he shoved his opponent in the face or chest, and is used as a noun.
the term don't argue was coined in australia
dribble goal
a goal kicked using the grubber technique
It is often utilised from the boundary line at a tight angle with players manipulating the bounce of the ball to bend it through the goals.
drop kick
1 a kick made by dropping the ball and kicking it as it bounces
Executed in a way that the foot contacts the ball at the same time as, or immediately after, it has been dropped to the ground on its end. No longer in common use in AFL due to its perceived inaccuracy. Once the preferred method of conveying the ball over long distances, it has been superseded by the drop punt as a more accurate means of delivering the ball to a fellow player.
2 an unpleasant , contemptible person
He's a real drop-kick. rhyming slang: drop-kick and punt for cunt
drop punt
a kick made by dropping the ball and kicking it before it hits the ground
The ball is held vertically, and dropped and kicked before it hits the ground, resulting in the ball spinning backwards end over end.
It is the primary method of disposing the ball by foot.
It is considered more accurate and easier to mark than a regular punt kick, which is held flat and does not spin in the air. Jack Dyer, aka Captain Blood, is generally credited with inventing the drop punt during his playing days with the Richmond Football Club.
dummy
referring to a player deceiving the opposition to gain an advantage
It is used to evade a tackler by feigning a movement, then changing direction suddenly to escape the opponent who has been fooled by the move, believing he is going to pass, shoot, or move in a certain direction, instead doing something entirely different.

Glossary of Terms

Australian Football has developed a unique and rich terminology.
This list is an alphabetical glossary of terms, jargon and slang.

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